Looking Back on the Good and Bad of the 2015 Offseason: Metropolitan Division

Updated: February 4, 2016 at 8:00 am by Cam Lewis

A few months ago, I looked at all of the moves made over the offseason with the goal of figuring out which trades and signings were good and bad, and what each teams goals were and whether or not they did a good job of making personnel changes to achieve them. Now, since an adequate amount of time has passed, I’m going to pull those assessments up, throw on my hindsight goggles, and look back on the good and the bad moves from the 2015 offseason.  

The Metro Division looked pretty predictable at the end of the summer. The Penguins would run away with it, and the Islanders, Rangers, and Capitals would all grab playoff spots while the Blue Jackets would fight somebody from the Atlantic Division for a wild card berth. That hasn’t happened at all.

The Carolina Hurricanes and New Jersey Devils were supposed to be battling for lottery picks this year, but instead, after pretty quiet offseasons, they’re both right in the hunt for playoff positions in early February. The Penguins have been tremendously disappointing, and may have made a terrible mistake not working harder to upgrade their situation on defence this summer, while the Capitals are running away with the division instead of them. And the Blue Jackets couldn’t look more hopeless. 

CAROLINA HURRICANES

  • OFFSEASON MOVES:
  • Signed Chris Terry to a one-year, $0.875 million contract.
  • Traded a 2015 third round pick and a 2016 seventh round pick to the Vancouver Canucks for Eddie Lack.
  • Traded Anton Khudobin to the Anaheim Ducks for James Wisniewski. 
  • Signed Andrej Nestrasil to a two-year contract with a $0.912 million cap hit.
  • Bought out Alexander Semin. He’ll carry a cap hit of $2.33 million for five years.
  • Signed Riley Nash to a one-year, $1.150 million contract.
  • Traded Dennis Robertson, Jake Massie, and a fifth round pick in 2017 to the Chicago Blackhawks for Kris Versteeg, Joakim Nordstrom, and a third round pick in 2017. 
  • Signed Elias Lindholm to a two-year contract extension with a $2.7 million cap hit. 
  • REGULAR SEASON MOVES:
  • IN: James Wisniewski, Eddie Lack, Noah Hanifin, Kris Versteeg, and Joakim Nordstrom. 
  • OUT: Alexander Semin, Patrick Dwyer, Brett Bellmore, Jack Hillen, Anton Khudobin, Dennis Robertson, and Jake Massie.

The Carolina Hurricanes have been an interesting story this year. They weren’t very good last year, and since they didn’t really do anything to get any better over the summer, it was widely embraced that the they would be one of the teams battling for a top draft pick come June. That’s reasonable, right? I mean, they had the fifth worst record in the league last year, winning just 30 games, and the only players they added to last year’s group are Kris Versteeg, Joakim Nordstrom, Eddie Lack, and James Wisniewski, who’s only appeared in 47 seconds of action this season. 

Oh yeah, they also added Noah Hanifin, who was probably their most interesting acquisition of the offseason. The Canes selected the skilled defenceman with the fifth overall pick in the draft last summer, and if at any point in time there was ever a shred of doubt that they made the right choice, there isn’t now. Hanifin has stepped nicely into the Canes’ lineup, averaging over 17 minutes in ice timer per game and producing an impressive 52.4 Corsi For percentage at even strength. Along with the excellent Justin Faulk, the Canes have the makings of a very, very good future defensive core. 

Anyways, back to the Canes being an interesting story. So they didn’t do a hell of a lot to make their team better last summer, and it was expected that they would be tanking this year. But for most of the season, the Canes have been one of the league’s elite possession teams, and despite weak goaltending and a poor shooting percentage, they’re right in the mix for a payoff spot. That puts them in a conundrum. Eric Staal and Cam Ward are unrestricted free agents at the end of the season, and both were expected to be traded for rebuild reinforcements some time before the trade deadline. Along with Ward and Staal, the Canes have a handful of other pieces (Versteeg, John-Michael Liles, Nathan Gerbe) who could be attractive to teams looking for a playoff boost. 

They came into 2015-16 with the goal of aiding their rebuild, and being in the thick of a playoff race shouldn’t change that. I guess we’ll see what they do come deadline time, but I would be shocked if Ron Francis and Co. let his team’s slight success cloud the overall plan.  

COLUMBUS BLUE JACKETS 

  • OFFSEASON MOVES:
  • Signed Curtis McElhinney to a two-year contract with a $0.800 million cap hit.
  • Traded Artem Anisimov, Marko Dano, Jeremy Morin, Corey Tropp, and a 2016 fourth round pick to the Blackhawks for Brandon Saad, Michael Paliotta, and Alex Broadhurst.
  • Signed Gregory Campbell to a two-year contract with a $1.50 million cap hit.
  • Signed Brandon Saad to a six-year contract with a $6.0 million cap hit. 
  • Signed Matt Calvert to a three-year contract with a $2.2 million cap hit. 
  • Signed David Savard to a five-year contract extension with a $4.25 million cap hit. 
  • REGULAR SEASON MOVES:
  • Traded Ryan Johansen to the Nashville Predators for Seth Jones. 
  • Lost Kevin Connauton on waivers to the Arizona Coyotes.
  • Lost Andrew Bodnarkchuk on waivers to the Colorado Avalanche. 
  • IN: Brandon Saad, Rene Bourque, Gregory Campbell, Michael Paliotta, Alex Broadhurst, and Seth Jones 
  • OUT: Artem Anisimov, Marko Dano, Jeremy Morin, Corey Tropp, Jack Skille, Mark Letestu, Ryan Johansen, Andrew Bodnarkchuk, and Kevin Connauton. 

“Don’t look now, but the Columbus Blue Jackets look like they’re finally turning themselves into a legitimate contender,” I said, in regards to what the Jackets did last summer. What the hell was I thinking? After a disappointing season last year, thanks largely to their roster being decimated by injuries, it was expected the Blue Jackets were going to pull themselves together and finally take the step forward we’ve been waiting for since they came into existence. 

And that certainly hans’t happened. The Jackets have been healthier than they were last year, but they still own some of the worst underlying numbers in the league, and as a result, they look more like the early 2000s Jackets than anything close to a contender.

Obviously most of the roster has has underachieved, but perhaps the biggest disappointment on the Blue Jackets has come from Sergei Bobrovsky. The former Vezina Trophy winner missed a good chunk of last season, and it was expected that if he had been healthy and between the pipes for Columbus, they would have made a stronger push for a payoff spot. This year, he’s injured again, and when he has been on the ice, he hasn’t been good at all. It was inevitable that he wouldn’t reproduce his magical 2012-13 season, but his 0.911 save percentage is significantly lower than the numbers he’s put up in his other two seasons in Columbus. 

Anyways, this is supposed to be about Columbus’ offseason, so let’s look at the one major move they made last summer. They sent Artem Anisimov, Marko Dano, Jeremy Morin, Corey Tropp, and a 2016 fourth round pick to the Blackhawks for Brandon Saad (who they quickly signed to a six-year, $36 million deal), Michael Paliotta, and Alex Broadhurst in what was a pretty polarizing deal. Obviously it was a lot to give up for Saad, because Anisimov is a good player in his own right, and Dano is a pretty nice prospect, but the Jackets figured that Saad would give the team the offensive boost it needed to be legitimate. 

Through 50 games, Saad had 19 goals and 16 assists and is leading the team in scoring, so he’s performing as well as anybody could realistically have expected from him. Unfortunately for them, it hasn’t been enough. The Jackets have a lot of work to do this summer, because it appears that this core they’ve assembled didn’t one that’s finally going to lead the franchise to success. 

NEW JERSEY DEVILS

  • OFFSEASON MOVES:
  • Traded a 2015 second round pick and a 2016 third round pick to the Ducks for Kyle Palmieri.
  • Signed John Moore to a three-year contract with a $1.667 million cap hit. 
  • Signed Eric Gelinas to a two-year contract with a $1.575 million cap hit. 
  • Signed Adam Larsson to a six-year contract with a $4.167 million cap hit. 
  • Bought out Dainius Zubrus. He’ll carry a cap hit of $3.10 million for one year. 
  • Signed Jiri Tlusty to a one-year, $0.800 million contract.
  • Signed David Schlemko to a one-year, $0.625 million contract.
  • Signed Lee Stempniak to a one-year, $0.850 million contract. 
  • REGULAR SEASON MOVES:
  • Traded a conditional seventh round pick to the L.A. Kings for Brian O’Neill. 
  • IN: Kyle Palmieri, John Moore, Jiri Tlusty, David Schlemko, and Lee Stempniak. 
  • OUT: Dainius Zubrus, Steve Bernier, Scott Gomez, Martin Havlat, Michael Ryder, Mark Fraser, Bryce Salvador.

I labelled the Hurricanes and the New Jersey Devils as the two teams who probably had the most boring offseasons in the league the last time I checked in. Now, more than six months later, they’re two of the most surprising stories in the NHL. After coming into the season with virtually zero expectations, the Devils have found themselves right in the thick of the playoff race in the Metro Division. But just like the Canes, while they’re right there, they’re also rebuilding and paving a path for future success. They have nine players on their current roster set to become unrestricted free agents this summer and quite a few of them will make attractive bargaining chips when the trade deadline rolls around at the end of the month. 

The name at the top of that list is Lee Stempniak, who the Devils brought in towards the end of the summer on a cheap, one-year deal. Now he’s leading the team in scoring, having one of the best seasons of his career, and appears to be possibly the best low-key signing of the entire offseason. I mean, he’s always been a good depth player (why the Jets just let him walk away I don’t know) but he’s on pace to score 23 goals and put up 62 points, which is incredibly good value for what he’s being paid. 

Along with Stempniak, the Devils made another good low-key move grabbing defenceman David Schlemko from the bargain bin towards the end of the summer. Schlemko has bouncer around the league the last couple of years, making stops in Dallas and Calgary after playing the majority of his career with the Phoenix/Arizona Coyotes. His possession numbers have always been pretty good, and this year, while playing in an increased role, he’s seen his production increase beyond what’s usually been expected from him. 

Like I said, though, the Devils are in the same situations as the Hurricanes and need to decide whether they’re going to carry forward with the plan of selling assets and building for the future, or hanging on to the pieces that currently have them tied for a playoff spot.  

NEW YORK ISLANDERS 

  • OFFSEASON MOVES:
  • Traded Griffin Reinhart to the Oilers for a 2015 first round pick (from the Penguins) and a 2015 second round pick. 
  • Signed Anders Lee to a four-year contract with a $3.75 million cap hit.
  • Signed Thomas Greiss to a two-year contract with a $1.5 million cap hit.
  • Signed Thomas Hickey to a three-year contract with a $2.2 million cap hit. 
  • Lost Kevin Poulin on waivers to the Tampa Bay Lightning. 
  • Signed Brock Nelson to a three-year contract with a $2.5 million cap hit. 
  • Signed Steve Bernier to a one-year, $0.750 million contract. 
  • Signed Marek Zidlicky to a one-year, $2.840 million contract. 
  • Traded Michael Grabner to the Toronto Maple Leafs for Carter Verhaeghe, Christopher Gibson, Tom Nilsson, Taylor Beck, and Matthew Finn.
  • REGULAR SEASON MOVES: 
  • Signed Eric Boulton to a one-year, $0.575 million contract. 
  • IN: Thomas Greiss, Steve Bernier, Marek Zidlicky, 
  • OUT: Griffin Reinhart, Michal Neuvirth, Matt Carkner, Lubomir Visnovsky, Tyler Kennedy, Kevin Poulin, and Michael Grabner. 

It seemed a little odd that the Islanders, after the breakout season they enjoyed last year, didn’t do much over the offseason to build on their success, especially after the shopping spree they blessed us with back in 2014. But with Kyle Okposo and Frans Nielsen set to hit the open market and with Ryan Strome and Casey Cizikas in need of new RFA deals this summer, it made sense for the Islanders to stand back and not wrap themselves into a bind. 

Outside of housekeeping, which involved locking up Thomas Hickey, Brock Nelson, and Anders Lee to new deals, the Islanders were very quiet last summer. They gave up on Griffin Reinhart, sending him to the Oilers for draft picks that ended up becoming Matt Barzal and Mitchell Stephens, and they sold Michael Grabner to the Leafs for a very long list of B level prospects. 

The only major addition they made through free agency was signing Thomas Greiss to a two-year contract, which has certainly paid off. Greiss has shared the net with Jaroslav Halak this season, and the two of them in tandem have formed one of the most formidable pairs in the league, as the Islanders sit eighth in the NHL with just 121 goals against. Halak has never really been a workhorse, as his career high in games played came last year when he made 59 appearances, so it’s nice for the Islanders to have a stronger plan B than they had last year with Chad Johnson. 

Also, random not: I don’t mind those black Brooklyn Nets jerseys the Islanders started wearing this year. I mean, the move to a venue in Brooklyn that shouldn’t be used for professional sports will take a while to accept, but those jerseys have grown on me. 

NEW YORK RANGERS 

  • OFFSEASON MOVES:
  • Traded Carl Hagelin, a 2015 second round pick and a 2015 sixth round pick to the Ducks for Emerson Etem and a 2015 second round pick. They then signed Etem to a one year, $0.850 million contract. 
  • Traded a Cam Talbot and a 2015 seventh round pick to the Oilers for a 2015 second round pick, a 2015 third round pick, and a 2015 seventh round pick. 
  • Traded Ryan Haggerty to the Blackhawks for Antti Raanta. 
  • Signed Raphael Diaz to a one-year, $0.800 million contract. 
  • Traded a 2017 sixth round pick to the Predators for Magnus Hellberg. 
  • Signed Viktor Stalberg to a one-year, $1.1 million contract. 
  • Signed J.T. Miller to a one-year, $0.874 million contract. 
  • Signed Jesper Fast to a two-year contract with a cap hit of $0.950 million. 
  • Signed Derek Stepan to a six-year contract with a $6.5 million cap hit. 
  • Signed Jarret Stoll to a one-year, $0.800 million contract. 
  • REGULAR SEASON MOVES:
  • Lost Jarret Stoll on waivers to the Minnesota Wild. 
  • Traded Emerson Etem to the Vancouver Canucks for Nicklas Jensen and a sixth round pick in 2017.
  • Signed Dan Paille to a one-year, $0.575 million contract. 
  • IN: Emerson Etem, Luke Adam, Brian Gibbons, Jayson Megna, Viktor Stalberg, Raphael Diaz, Antti Raanta. 
  • OUT: Martin St. Louis,  James Sheppard, Matt Hunwick, Cam Talbot. 

The Rangers were pretty strapped for cash last summer, so their offseason was based largely around housekeeping rather than making big splashes to improve their roster. They were faced with having to sign Carl Hagelin, J.T. Miller, Jesper Fast, and most importantly, Derek Stepan to new RFA deals without much in cap room available for them to work with. 

They dealt Hagelin to the Ducks for Emerson Etem, who signed a one-year, $0.850 million contract, which was simnifically lower than the four-year, $16 million deal Hagelin eventually signed in Anaheim. A few months later, the Rangers sent Etem to Vancouver for Nicklas Jensen, who also carries a pretty cheap cap hit and still has a ways to go before hitting UFA years. Also to save some money, the Ranger sent Cam Talbot to the Oilers for a collection of draft picks, and replaced him by acquiring Antti Raanta from the Blackhawks. Miller signed a one-year deal, while Fast signed for two years. Then in late July, the Rangers finally inked Stepan to a six-year deal worth $39 million. 

With all of that taken care of, the Rangers added Raphael Diaz, Viktor Stalberg, and Jerret Stoll as free agents, and none of them have really made a significant impact. Diaz has served as depth in the AHL, Stoll was claimed by the Wild on waivers, and Stalberg has been a decent bottom six option, producing seven goals and seven assists through 44 games. 

Next summer, they get to do it all again, as Chris Kreider and Kevin Hayes need new RFA deals, and Keith Yanlde hits the open market. Woohoo!  

PHILADELPHIA FLYERS 

  • OFFSEASON MOVES:
  • Traded Nicklas Grossmann and Chris Pronger’s contract to the Coyotes for Sam Gagner and a conditional 2016 or 2017 third round pick.
  • Signed Chris VandeVelde to a two-year contract with a $0.713 million cap hit.
  • Signed Michal Neuvirth to a two-year contract with a $1.625 million cap hit. 
  • Signed Michael Del Zotto to a two-year contract with a $3.875 million cap hit.
  • Signed Sean Couturier to a six-year contract extension with a $4.333 million cap hit. It’ll kick in at the start of the 2016-17 season. 
  • Signed Jakub Voracek to an eight-year contract extension with an $8.275 million cap hit. It’ll kick in at the start of the 2016-17 season.
  • REGULAR SEASON MOVES:
  • Traded Luke Schenn and Vincent Lecavalier to the L.A. Kings for Jordan Weal and a third round pick in 2016. 
  • IN: Sam Gagner, Michal Neuvirth, Davis Drewiske, Tim Brent, Chris Conner, and Jordan Weal. 
  • OUT: Chris Pronger’s contract, Nicklas Grossmann, Carlo Colaiacovo, Ray Emery, Luke Schenn, and Vincent Lecavalier. 

I didn’t give the Philadelphia Flyers much credit last summer, but they’ve actually done a very, very impressive job of dealing with their horrific cap situation. A year ago today, this franchise’s finances were in the gutter. They had a whole wealth of underachieving players who were coming nowhere near being worth what they were being paid, and they had Brayden Schenn, Sean Couturier, and Jakub Voracek inching towards free agency. So what we had in Philadelphia was a very mediocre team with a very expensive price tag. 

They didn’t get much going over the summer, as they were only able to unload Chris Pronger’s dead contract, but they had to take on Sam Gagner in return. The exodus finally came when the season began. They waived Andrew MacDonald and buried his contract in the minors, giving themselves a slight savings in that aspect. And then somehow, they managed to offload Vincent Lecavalier’s contract (and Luke Schenn) on to the L.A. Kings without taking anything back in return aside from salary retention. So even though they’re still carrying a decent amount of dead weight, the Flyers are slowly pulling themselves out of cap hell. 

Aside from all of that, the Flyers also locked down two key parts of their core to long-term deals last summer. Jakub Voracek enjoyed a breakout year in 2014-15, and the Flyers rewarded him with an eight-year, $66 million deal. He hasn’t produced at the same level he did last year, thanks largely to a comedically low shooting percentage that’s hindered him all season, but Voracek’s underlying numbers suggest that he’s still the elite producer that the Flyers signed to a massive contract (just in case you thought last season was some kind of mirage). Also, they inked Sean Couturier to a six-year, $26 million extension, so they’ll have him under control until he’s 28 years old at a reasonable $4.33 million cap hit. 

So those two together will cost the Flyers an extra ~$12.6 million next year when their extension kicks in, so they still have a ways to go in unloading dead weight. But both players are worth the contracts they’ve signed, and obviously the Flyers didn’t want to be forced to unload good players because they gave bad ones inked to ugly contracts.  

PITTSBURGH PENGUINS 

  • OFFSEASON MOVES:
  • Signed Ian Cole to a three-year contract with a $2.1 million cap hit. 
  • Signed Sergei Plotnikov to a one-year contract with a $3.775 million cap hit. 
  • Traded Kasperi Kapanen, Scott Harrington, Nick Spaling, a conditional first round pick and a 2016 third round pick for Phil Kessel, Tyler Biggs, Tim Erixon, and a conditional second round pick. 
  • Beau Bennett to a one-year, $0.800 million contract. 
  • Traded Brandon Sutter and a 2016 third round pick to the Canucks for Nick Bonino, Adam Clendening, and a 2016 second round pick. 
  • Signed Eric Fehr to a three-year contract with a $2.0 million cap hit.
  • Signed Matt Cullen to a one year, $0.800 million contract. 
  • REGULAR SEASON MOVES: 
  • Traded David Perron and Adam Clendening to the Anaheim Ducks for Carl Hagelin. 
  • Traded Rob Scuderi to the Chicago Blackhawks for Trevor Daley. 
  • IN: Phil Kessel, Sergei Plotnikov, Tim Erixon, Eric Fehr, Nick Bonino, Matt Cullen, Tyler Biggs, Conor Sheary, Kael Mouillierat, David Warsofsky, Steve Olskey, and Trevor Daley. 
  • OUT: Thomas Greiss, Brandon Sutter, Steve Downie, Craig Adams, Max Lapierre, Daniel Winnik, Christian Ehrhoff, Taylor Chorney, David Perron, and Adam Clendening. 

Last summer, it looked like the Penguins were on top of the world. Somehow, despite being one of those teams teetering on the cusp of cap hell, they managed to acquire Phil Kessel from the Toronto Maple Leafs, giving them what everybody assumed would be a perfect wingman for Sidney Crosby. Then they also sent Brandon Sutter to the Canucks for Nick Bonino, who’s probably just as good and also comes at a cheaper price. Then they also had some money left over so they decided to sign Eric Fehr, which also seemed like a good deal.

So when it was all said and done, the Penguins had given up Brandon Sutter, Nick Spaling, and a couple of players who weren’t on their roster last season (but decent prospects nonetheless) for an elite goalscorer and a legitimate and cheap replacement for Brandon Sutter. Oh yeah, and Eric Fehr. So, like I said, everything was looking good. The Penguins were going to go back to being the dominant team in the Eastern Conference and we were going to watch them make a joke of the NHL this season, scoring goals at will and not having to worry about their decrepit defence. 

Oh yeah, dammit, that defence. I guess they completely forgot about that whole thing. 

You look up and down this roster and think, “how on earth is this team in the bottom third in the NHL in goals scored?” That probably has something to do with the fact that Ben Lovejoy has logged the second most minutes of any defenceman on the team. Nobody (Kris Letang not included) can make a proper breakout pass to their forwards, which makes life pretty difficult for them. 

So far, the Penguins have been a massive disappointment. It’s not because the moves they made last summer were bad or anything, but it’s because they didn’t do much to address their gaping holes on defence. They only really have one competent player on their blue line, and he obviously can’t be on the ice at all times. So while the moves they made were good in theory, maybe they were barking up the wrong tree with what holes they were trying to fill last summer.  

WASHINGTON CAPITALS

  • OFFSEASON MOVES
  • Signed Nate Schmidt to a two-year contract with a $0.812 million cap hit.
  • Signed Jay Beagle to a three-year contract with a $1.75 million cap hit.
  • Signed Stanislav Galiev to a two-year contract with a $0.575 million cap hit. 
  • Signed Taylor Chorney to a one-year, $0.700 million cap hit. 
  • Signed Justin Williams to a two-year contract with a $3.250 million cap hit. 
  • Traded Troy Brouwer, Pheonix Copley, and a 2016 third round pick to the Blues for T.J. Oshie. 
  • Signed Dan Ellis to a one-year, $0.575 million contract. 
  • Signed Evgeny Kuznetsov to a two-year contract with a $3.0 million cap hit. 
  • Signed Zach Sill to a one-year, $0.575 million contract.
  • Signed Braden Holtby to a five-year contract with a $6.1 million cap hit. 
  • Signed Marcus Johansson to a one-year, $3.75 million contract. 
  • Signed Ryan Stanton to a one-year, $0.575 million contract. 
  • REGULAR SEASON MOVES:
  • Signed Mike Richards to a one-year, $1 million contract. 
  • IN: T.J. Oshie, Justin Williams, Taylor Chorney, Ryan Stanton, Zach Sill, Dan Ellis, and Mike Richards. 
  • OUT: Joel Ward, Troy Brouwer, Eric Fehr, Curtis Glencross, Mike Green, John Erskine, Tim Gleason. 

I think the Washington Capitals are pretty much the team we all expected the Penguins to be this year. They’ve scored 160 goals, which is the second most in the league, and thanks to some excellent goaltending, they’re basically making a joke of the Eastern Conference. 

Last year, you could classify the Capitals as a good but not great team. A big reason for that was the fact they lacked weapons behind Alex Ovechkin and Nicklas Backstrom. I mean, if you could stop those two, you had pretty much done your job, because there weren’t very many other players on the team behind them who posed much of a threat offensively. Ovechkin and Backstrom led the team with 81 and 78 points respectively, and then after that, the next highest player was John Carlson, who had 55 points. 

This year, thanks to the acquisition of Justin Williams (through free agency) and T.J. Oshie (through trade) and the emergence of Evgeny Kuznetsov as an elite producer, the Caps have suddenly become one of the deepest teams in the NHL. It’s only early February, and they already have six different forwards with at least 13 goals and they have eight skaters with 27 or more points. 

Along with adding Oshie and Williams, the Caps also locked up Braden Holtby to a long-term deal, signing him for five years at a solid cap hit of $6.1 million. And this season, he’s done everything to validate their decision, as his 0.929 save percentage and 12.75 goals saved above average are coming close to the incredible season that Carey Price had last year, which could put Holtby in the Hart Trophy discussion this year. Well, not really, because Patrick Kane, but I’m sure he’ll get a decent amount of second and third place votes, which is something. 

Anyways, the Caps are fantastic, they had an excellent offseason, and I’m excited to watch them play in the playoffs.